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Helping Britain build a green economy

Helping Britain build a green economy UK Power Networks has shared its plans to help Britain build a green economy.
From press releases - 20 March 2013 09:00 AM

UK Power Networks has shared its plans to help Britain build a green economy.

At the Future of Utilities conference today, Liam O’Sullivan, Low Carbon London programme director, discussed research progressing in London and elsewhere to support a low carbon future.

A wide range of trials are taking place at UK Power Networks to examine the most sustainable and cost-efficient way to connect more wind generation, electric vehicles and smaller scale renewable energy to the electricity network, without major network reinforcements.

Liam said network operators faced a radical shift in UK energy policy, with 35 per cent of electricity coming from renewable sources by 2020, decarbonisation of electricity generation by 2030 and an 80 per cent reduction in carbon emissions by 2050. The low carbon future is expected to have a significant impact on electricity distribution networks.

He said: “This is the beginning of a new era in the management of electricity distribution networks. We are actively enabling the transition to a low carbon economy. Our Low Carbon London research will be a national blueprint for a smart future electricity network.

“Our research is simulating a 2020 scenario today to address the challenges and opportunities electricity network operators face in powering cities in a low carbon future. We are learning how to create a smart low carbon city using new technologies commercial innovations and network management strategies.”

London is an ideal case study as it has the highest carbon footprint of all Britain’s cities. It is also critical to the nation’s economy and anticipates the new challenges facing urban electricity networks. The research has been underway for two years and will conclude in 2014, when UK Power Networks will publish its findings and solutions will be integrated into the business.